Choosing the Right Roof for Your Climate

Michigan weather can be tricky. From rain to wind to snow, we get it all here in the Northern Midwest. To help protect your roof from the craziness of Michigan weather, it is important to know what kinds of roofs do best in our particular climate.  No matter the harsh weather that Michigan is known for, your roof needs to be ready. As weather can have such an impact on your roof, it is best to consult your local Shelby roofer to ease the decision-making process. For more info, consult this quick roofing solutions guide for different climates:


Best Roofing Solutions For Harsh Weather Conditions

Snow/ Summer Rain

Pitched roofs are those that are visible as you approach a building. This type of roofing system will likely be best for snow and rain.  Melting snow and summer rain will be able to make its way off the roof leaving less risk of water damage.

There are many material options for pitched roofs, including shingles, wood shake, tile, metal or slate. For areas with heavy snow accumulation, metal might be preferable because other materials may lead to costly ice damage issues. Depending on the specific factors affecting your facility or building, metal options range from cold-rolled steel or zincalume to painted steel, painted aluminum, or even copper or zinc.

One of the most important decisions you can make for a pitched roof is the underlayment because it will impact its durability. For example, a #30 felt is the typical underlayment for tile and metal; however, synthetic or modified underlayments tend to have a longer service life.

Heavy Rain / Strong wind

Either a pitched roofing system or a flat roof would be ideal for heavy rain and strong winds with each having its pros and cons. The advantage of a pitched roof is water drains rapidly. The downside is that depending on how strong the wind is roof material can be stripped away, or in a worst-case scenario, the roof can uplift and detach from the walls.

If properly installed, flat roof systems will hold up to strong winds, but are more susceptible to water leakage after heavy rain. With proper maintenance and annual inspections, this roofing system is also a great fit for many building facing heavy rain and strong winds, but just be sure to use a material that is continuous with no open seams.

Materials make all the difference. For a pitched roof, shingles are the most popular because of their water resistant properties. However, they are not waterproof and rely heavily on the roof’s slope to drive water off the roof. Again, metal could also be a good choice for these types of weather conditions. Materials for a flat roof include TPO, PVC, built-up systems and spray polyurethane foam, — to name a few — and each has its benefits. For example, spray polyurethane foam is fairly simple to maintain and provides insulation and soundproofing.

Dry Heat / Summer Storms

In dry desert climates like Arizona, Utah and Nevada, a pitched or flat roofing system will work. However, with both roofing systems, you need to consider that thermal shock is a possibility. Thermal shock occurs when a roof that has been baking in the sun is rained on. The rain rapidly draws heat out of the roofing material, causing it to shrink as it cools. This rapid cooling can cause the roofing material to crack because it is shrinking on the surface faster than the bottom can accommodate. With rain, the roof temperature may drop as much as 100 degrees F. within a matter of minutes, which places a severe strain on the roof system.

As for materials, the flat roof materials (mentioned above) are standard. However, it is key to note that the heat and sun damages organic roofing materials faster than elsewhere and regular maintenance is encouraged. For a pitched roof, you can get creative and have anything from metal to shingle, to tile. If you choose to go with tile, they are available in a selection of profiles and colors ranging from hand-made sun-dried “sandcast” tile to clay and concrete.

Read the complete article at bdmag.com

     

Original Post here: Choosing the Right Roof for Your Climate

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Addressing the Consequences of Roof Leaks

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Roof leaks are a complete nuisance. The drip-drip-drip of falling water through a ceiling can drive anyone insane. More than just annoying, roof leaks are often incredibly damaging to the overall integrity of your roof. To prevent any further damage, consult roofing companies and get it fixed to save yourself some serious headaches in the long run.

How to Address 5 Consequences of Roof Leaks

Roof leaks. The mother of all maintenance concerns that property managers and building owners face. Roof leaks equate to time and expenses that you might not have budgeted for.  How can something so physically small cause such large problems? Beyond the damage to the roof itself, roof leaks can create several major headaches inside the building. Called “consequential damage,” these issues are unlikely to be covered by any roofing system warranty, and if left to fester, the cost of addressing these issues can be exponentially higher than what it would have cost to proactively maintain your roof in the first place. Here are five common forms of consequential damage from roof leaks: 

Here are five common forms of consequential damage from roof leaks: 

1) Ceiling tiles falling and causing damage to inventory: It doesn’t take much of a leak before water causes walls, floors and ceilings to deteriorate to the point it also damages inventory, furniture and equipment inside the building. Now the leak is impacting your ability to sell, manufacture or simply perform work.

  • What to do: It’s most important to determine the source of the leak to temporarily stop the water intrusion, so first check the most common leak points: missing flashing, cuts, tears, holes and open seams.

2) Slip and falls:  It’s rarely a good sign when someone from human resources gets involved in your maintenance business, but that’s precisely what can happen when water from roof leaks causes slip and fall hazards – i.e. workers’ comp claims – inside the building. Litigation risks worsen if the building is one where customers would be present. 

  • What to do: To prevent slips and falls due to wet flooring, make sure you take immediate action to clean up the water, mark off the affected area, post “wet floor” signage and use absorbent mats. 

3) Wet insulation:  When insulation gets wet it does a number on your utility costs. It goes from being an insulator, saving you money, to a conductor, costing you additional money to heat and cool the building. 

  • What to do: Identifying wet insulation before it gets to the point of becoming a major issue typically involves infrared scans. Make infrared inspections a regular part of your routine maintenance program to save considerable dollars in the long run. Remove any wet insulation you find, and replace it with the same R-value thickness.

4) Mold/insects/contamination:  Further, wet insulation is a breeding ground for mold, and it’s not uncommon to find instances of mold and bacteria growth in and around a roof system resulting from leaks. Insect infestation is another potential consequence. Costs to mitigate mold or exterminate insects can add up, not to mention code violations and disruptions to business operations. 

  • What to do: Your first step should be to further inspect the area to try and identify the extent of the mold and the source of the leak. No mold remediation is complete without locating and repairing any remaining building leaks, and no roof repair/restoration is quality work if it involves covering over mold contamination. 

5) Acceleration of the age of the roof:  The key to managing roof-related expenses is to get the most service life out of the roof as you can. You want to avoid costly replacements as long as possible through timely and disciplined maintenance, repairs and restorations. Water that penetrates the roof through a leak gets under the roof membrane and damages the deck, seams and mechanical fasteners, which in turn compromises your roof. In colder climates this can lead to ice formation under the laps, which, through expansion, further stresses the building and roof. 

  • What to do : Seek information on roof asset management programs that not only include visual and infrared analyses, but also extensive testing of the roof membrane, to calculate a roof’s service life expectancy and determine whether roof replacements can be delayed through cost effective restorations and/or repairs.

Roof leaks are no joke. Water is the silent enemy of roof systems, and it’s no picnic once it gets inside the building, either. Properly maintain and inspect your roofs. Have a reliable, trustworthy contractor on speed dial and don’t hesitate to make the call. 


—buildings.com

 

Original Post over here: Addressing the Consequences of Roof Leaks

Why You Should Hire a Roofing Contractor Instead of Doing it Yourself

There are a lot of great weekend DIY projects out there, but roofing is often best left to professional roofing contractors. Before you set out to repair or update your own roof,  schedule a consultation with local Michigan roofing contractors to help you consider your options.

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Depending on what field you are specialized in, you might have absolutely no knowledge of how roofing works, and what the best techniques are. Most roofing professionals spend hours upon hours working with other contractors, perfecting the skill before setting out in business on their own. They are licensed and know exactly how much material will be needed for your home. Those setting out to do this project for their own home have a tendency to either grossly over, or underestimate how much material will be needed.

No amount of research and studying will give you the same knowledge that experience can. You don’t want to make an experiment out of your home—get the roof replaced properly the first time to prevent further projects from being needed. By doing a poor job yourself, you will only be spending more money hiring somebody else to come take care of the mess you created.

Safety

Every day brings an unfortunate number of falling accidents; many resulting in extreme injury or even death. Do all you can to avoid these situations and be safe. When you are learning a new skill, most of your attention is dedicated to completing the task, not your surroundings. In some cases this is just fine, but when it comes to fixing the roof, this is downright dangerous. If you do choose to take on this task, be sure you have somebody there working beside you, to ensure you are safe throughout the entire process.

Not only do professionals have the knowledge to get the job done right, they also have the tools needed for whatever challenges your roof may possess. Their equipment allows them to do all the repairs, and remain safe as well. Even though roofing has been around for years, the technology and techniques have continued to change. Let somebody who has been through all the twists and turns of the industry finish the task.

Time

If you do it right the first time, doing your own roof may save you a little bit of money, but will take an immense amount of your time. Most people don’t know what they are doing when the head up to the roof and begin the project. This only makes it more difficult. The time you spend may be for nothing if you make even the smallest mistake.

For those who make a major mistake, it is then necessary to call a roofing professional, which will cost you much more in the long run. If the roofing company makes a mistake, they will come and fix the problem, usually at no extra cost to you. When you make a mistake, you are left with the disaster. Why You Should Hire a Roofing Contractor Instead of Doing it Yourself

 

First Posted here: Why You Should Hire a Roofing Contractor Instead of Doing it Yourself

Keep the Roof Over Your Head in Good Shape for Longer

Roof One doesn’t just fix your roof, we help to maintain it. I’m sure we can all agree that it’s important to have a roof that supports your home for a number of years. To help you upkeep your roof, here are some DIY tips!

http://www.networx.com/article/keep-the-roof-over-your-head-in-good-shaKeep the Roof Over Your Head in Good Shape for Longer – Articles – Networx “A roof over one’s head” is a synonym for home. And no wonder … your roof faithfully performs the essential task of shielding your family and your belongings from the elements. Return the favor by taking good care of your roof. These simple tips will help extend its useful life.

Maintain Your Roof

Don’t allow leaves or snow to accumulate on your roof. (Clear out gutters regularly too!) Leaves will trap moisture from dew and rain, holding it against the roof where it can do damage. Snow will melt and refreeze, causing ice dams. In addition, the sheer weight of a winter’s worth of snow may be more than your elderly roof was designed to handle.

Trim any overhanging tree limbs so they’re no less than 10 feet from your roof. Not only will this prevent leaves falling onto the house, it also safeguards against branches scraping the roof during a storm. Third, exposing the roof to sunlight deters the growth of moss and mold. Last but not least, this measure blocks access to your roof by squirrels and other animal pests.

Avoid walking on the roof to inspect or clean it. This can be dangerous for both your roof and yourself. Standing solidly on the ground, use a dedicated non-metal roof rake to pull off fresh snow or fallen leaves. Spray with a garden hose to remove moss or algae buildup in summer. Avoid pressure washing, which has tremendous destructive potential when unleashed on your roof; the powerful stream can loosen roofing tabs, unglue the shingles’ self-adhesive, and wash off the reflective granules.

Schedule a professional roof inspection regularly every 2-3 years, as well as after severe weather like hail or heavy winds.

Ventilate the Attic

During the winter, people tend to keep their homes closed up. This allows warm moist air from showering, cooking, or running appliances such as humidifiers to collect in your attic if it is not adequately ventilated. And guess what is sitting right on top of your attic? Hello! The underside of your roof.

The situation is no better in summertime when an insufficiently ventilated attic can play host to air at temperatures as high as 160 degrees. This kind of heat is very, very bad news for your roof rafters and asphalt shingles.

Don’t despair, though. If you have properly functioning air intake vents combined with exhaust ventilation in your attic, excessive heat and moisture will be directed where you want them, outside the house.

Watch Out for Roofing’s Red Flags

Stay alert. Loose, buckled, or missing shingles need to be taken care of ASAP, as they are an open invitation for moisture to penetrate your roof. If you tackle the problem early enough, you may need to replace only the affected shingles, instead of paying for a whole new roof.

Damp or peeling patches on your attic ceiling, dripping water, or light shining through are obvious signs that your roof is in big trouble. However, those are not the only red flags to watch out for. Exposed roof beams or doors and windows that are suddenly hard to open may also be signaling that excess moisture is getting into your house, most likely via the roof. All of these symptoms are another indication that it’s time to call in a roofing contractor.

Recognize when it’s Time to Replace

All good things eventually come to an end, and your roofing material is no exception. After a certain point, it makes more sense to replace, rather than to repair, the roof, namely when one or more of these is true:

 

First Posted over here: Keep the Roof Over Your Head in Good Shape for Longer

Budgeting for Home Repairs and Improvements

Summer is around the corner, which usually means peak home improvement season. We understand that creating the right budget to fix all of your home repairs and improvements can be tough. Here are a few tips to help you along the way.

Once you figure out your budget, give Roof One a call! We’d be happy to offer your our contracting services.

http://www.networx.com/article/how-can-i-afford-home-improvement-and-reHow Can I Afford Home Improvement And Repair? – Articles – Networx Is there a contractor in your future? After a long hard winter, you might very well need a few fenceposts replaced — or a whole new roof. Or perhaps you’d like to celebrate spring by installing your dream kitchen or patio. Not to be a Debby Downer, but all those things cost money. Before you pick up the phone to hire a roofer, remodeler, or concrete specialist, take a good hard look at how you can afford the home repair or improvement you’re considering.

DISCLAIMER: Loan periods and interest rates vary. Consult your financial adviser for detailed information about your specific situation.

THINK, THINK, THINKMake a list of all the repairs and home improvement projects that you are daydreaming about. Then bring those dreams down to earth by carefully considering each task:

Prioritize your spending; allocate funds first to crucial home repairs or renovation projects that offer an excellent return on investment, such as attic insulation (107.7% ROI) or entry door replacement (90.7% for a new steel door).

DO YOUR HOMEWORKThe internet makes it fast and easy to research your pet projects. Compare price, appearance, and durability of various materials – for example, hardwood flooring versus laminate. Check out ways to save without sacrificing quality … perhaps by buying tiles in last year’s style (just be sure to purchase a few extra to allow for breakage and future repairs). Find out the going rate for home improvement contractors in your area. In addition to materials and labor, allow sufficient funds for hidden costs. To illustrate: during a major home remodel, you might have to find temporary accommodation and furniture storage for a while.

LOOK FOR FREE MONEYIn the case of a repair, start by checking with your insurance provider to see whether your homeowners policy will cover the job. Investigate federal, state, and municipal grants, community development programs, or assistance from nonprofit organizations for essential home repairs and/or improvements. Search for rebates, tax credits, and incentives offered by government agencies or utility companies on environmentally friendly upgrades, such as the installation of high-efficiency HVAC equipment.

DIY OR NOT?Do-it-yourself might seem like an easy, affordable solution and there are lots of instructional videos that show how to perform simple repairs — like fixing a dripping faucet. It’s important to be realistic, though. Do you have the time and patience (not to mention the practical skills and equipment) to do a topnotch job? Make sure to pull all necessary permits and work to code. Negligence in this area may lead to more financial trouble down the road, when you try making insurance claims or selling your house.

USE CREDIT CARDS — WISELYAre you surprised at the idea of financing home improvement with plastic? It actually makes more sense than you might think for projects under $15,000. Your card can provide quick funding up to your credit limit, without the paperwork of a bank loan – very useful when you suddenly need to repair a roof leak or spruce up before an open house. The debt is unsecured so you don’t risk losing your house if you get behind in the payments. You’ll also earn yourself a bundle of rewards points. Best-case scenario: take advantage of low- or no-interest credit card promotions and be sure to pay off your balance in full before the offer expires. Otherwise, you will be facing hefty interest charges, to the tune of 15 percent or higher.

TAKE A PERSONAL LOANFor improvements or repairs costing between $15,000 and $50,000, a personal loan might be the way to go. The application process is streamlined and this type of unsecured loan does not require you to put up your home as collateral. Interest rates are fairly high, though, starting at approximately 7 percent APR or more, depending on your credit rating, geographical location, loan amount, and term.

TAP YOUR HOME EQUITYOn the other hand, to finance $15,000-50,000 worth of work on your house, your best bet could be a home equity line of credit (aka “a second mortgage”), especially if your credit rating is not so hot. A HELOC offers lower interest rates than an unsecured personal loan – about 4 percent with an excellent credit rating — and is convenient to use for multiple small home improvement expenses, but you are literally betting the farm (or your home) that you will be able to make the payments on time every month.

COVER HOME AND IMPROVEMENTS WITH A 203KAre you considering buying a fixer-upper — or does your current home need some fundamental repairs? An FHA 203K loan could be the right type of financing for you. It is basically a mortgage (new or refinanced) that covers both the house purchase price and the planned improvements. Interest charges on this type of loan may amount to as much as 1 percent more than conventional mortgage financing, but it offers 2 major advantages: a 203K allows you to borrow a substantial amount and pay it off over an extended period.

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Original Post right here: Budgeting for Home Repairs and Improvements

How To Tackle 12 Minor Accidents At Home

Roof One gladly serves the Michigan community on big roofing and construction projects. But what about the small things within the home, like wear and tear? We’re happy to help with that too, however, if you’d like to take a stab at it first, here are some DIY tips and tricks to tackling the minor house issues.

http://www.homeadvisor.com/r/12-accidents-at-home-and-how-to-fix-them/#.WRYjubzyvVo12 Little Accidents at Home and How to Fix Them – HomeAdvisor Your home suffers a lot of wear and tear each day. It’s normal to see hints of damage here and there – but wouldn’t it be nicer without them. What can you do to clear up after a minor domestic catastrophe?

Whether it’s damage that comes from repeated use, or a one-off accident that’s left a mark, little flaws around the home can detract from all your good intentions. Everything seems nicely decorated, and then your eyes drift to a horrible scratch or a stain in the carpet. It can be difficult to know how to fix these problems without making them worse.

Well, every blemish needs its own solution – but the solutions are out there. Did you know that petroleum jelly is ideal for getting rid of mug rings on tables? It’s just one of many surprising household uses this weird substance has!

Bigger disasters, like spilling wax on your carpet, can be dealt with using easy-to-find tools. With wax, the best thing to do is to cover the spillage with kitchen paper, and heat it up with a hairdryer. Once the towel is saturated with wax, replace it with it with a fresh one and do it again. Keep trying until the wax is all gone – it shouldn’t take long.

You never know where the next bit of damage is going to appear. We’ve put together a new infographic, with easy instructions on how to deal with a number of common mishaps around the home.

It might sometimes feel like your house has a life of its own. With these handy tips, you’ll be ready to give it a little tender loving care whenever required.

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First Posted here: How To Tackle 12 Minor Accidents At Home

5 Myths about Attic Ventilation

Ventilation is crucial to the life and effectiveness of every roofing system. Proper attic ventilation systems allow a continuous flow of outside air through the attic, protecting the efficiency of the insulation and helping to lower temperatures in the living space. It consists of a balance between air intake (at your eaves or soffits) and air exhaust (at or near your roof ridge).

Many people have preconceived notions about ventilation and how it works, but we’re here to clear that up. Here are 5 myths about attic ventilation.

Roof One will proudly serve you to make sure your home has the proper ventilation.

http://www.homeadvisor.com/r/5-myths-about-attic-ventilation/#.WQUQ21PyvVo5 Myths about Attic Ventilation Few things are more misunderstood about the home than attic ventilation. In essence, all ventilation is about circulating air to keep it fresh and to reduce moisture levels. About 90 percent of homes in the US have unreasonably high levels of moisture. Understanding whether your home could benefit from some form of attic ventilation might just be, if not a life-saver, a roof-saver. Here are some of the myths and the facts you need to know about attic ventilation.

Just like properly sizing your furnace and air conditioning unit, you want precisely the right amount of attic ventilation for your home. Insufficient ventilation can lead to moisture problems during the winter and decreased energy efficiency during the summer but too much ventilation can be just as bad, if not worse. Roof vents create an additional roof penetration, essentially another place of vulnerability where leaks can occur. Some vents are necessary, but you don’t want to needlessly increase the number of roof penetrations. More than leaks, these seams can cause blowouts during a hurricane or allow sparks from a wildfire to enter your home and set it ablaze.

So, how much ventilation should you have? Without exception, you should talk to a professional to determine what your home requires. Generally speaking, you need a ratio of 1:300, where for every 300 square feet of ceiling space, you need 1 square foot of attic ventilation. That said, air resistance and interference (such as vent grates) reduces the area of true ventilation. In other words, the entire vent opening doesn’t count as vented space.

Too many people believe the importance of roof ventilation is to increase energy efficiency during the summer. Good roof ventilation can do this, but shingle color, sun exposure and insulation are exponentially more important to overall energy efficiency than ventilation. Sure, installing roof vents for older homes can reduce your hot air during the summer, but there are probably more low-risk, cost-effective ways to increase your home’s energy efficiency.

Meanwhile, preventing moisture damage is a much greater benefit and applies to colder climates more than warmer ones. In fact, the colder the climate, the more likely it is that your home will benefit from attic ventilation. In order to install an unvented roofing system in colder climates, you’ll need highly rated, rigid insulation to prevent condensation on your roof sheathing. In warmer climates, you don’t need to worry about condensation. Think about how often dew forms on your grass. In these climates, hot attic spaces are eliminated by installing a thermal barrier along the roof line, instead of the attic floor.

Too many people believe that because heat rises, ventilating an attic space during the winter means you’re releasing warm air and creating a drag on your heating efficiency. If this is true, you’ve got bigger problems to worry about than letting warm air escape from your home. Poor insulation is usually the culprit, although if you enter the attic on sunny, winter day, your attic space can be warmed by the sun more than your furnace.

Unless your roofing system has insulation on the roofing deck and is designed without ventilation, your furnace should not be heating your attic. Worse yet, inadequate insulation is almost surely allowing moisture-laden air into your attic. When this warm, moist air hits your roof, it’s likely to form condensation that will lead to further deterioration of your insulation and/or wood rot. If you think this might be a concern, wait till the sun goes down and measure the temperature in your attic. It should be pretty close to the outdoor temperature.

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First Posted right here: 5 Myths about Attic Ventilation